Oct 21, 2014 / 180,501 notes

(via bookishboi)

Oct 21, 2014 / 2,265 notes

fatspro:

blcksupremacy:

☀💙channeling the last lil bits of warmth and positivity from summer💙☀

So pretty.

(via bookishboi)

Oct 20, 2014 / 1,861 notes

pankurios-templeovarts:

Psychic creatures forged by Sarah Louise Davey.

(via delusionaltom)

Oct 18, 2014 / 10,604 notes

bloodstainedvibrator:

selections from the watercolor series I don’t want your love unless you know I am repulsive, and love me even as you know it. 

Emily Kaelin

http://society6.com/emilykaelin

(via whenyoufallyoufly)

likeafieldmouse:

Tony Cragg
Oct 6, 2014 / 7,173 notes
Oct 6, 2014 / 16,599 notes

spacecase-hamster:

jhenne-bean:

steampunktendencies:

Jellyfish Air Plants (PetitBeast)

THIS IS SO DOPE

arochihaya

(via causticandvulgar)

minds-atlarge:

Blue Seascape, Wave Effect - Georges Lacombe1893
Oct 6, 2014 / 39,129 notes

minds-atlarge:

Blue Seascape, Wave Effect - Georges Lacombe1893

(via poetorfool)

jeanne detallante // vogue italia // may 2005
Oct 2, 2014

jeanne detallante // vogue italia // may 2005


Franz Jozef Kline, Black Angle with Yellow (Oil and paper collage laid on canvas), 1959.
Sep 30, 2014 / 1,192 notes

Franz Jozef Kline, Black Angle with Yellow (Oil and paper collage laid on canvas), 1959.

(via stumblequeen)


West coast Wild Fennel by Michelle Morin
Sep 30, 2014 / 12,912 notes

West coast Wild Fennel by Michelle Morin

(via stumblequeen)


In the Deepest Embrace of the Night, Ricardo Rangel, 1970, from the series Our Nightly Bread
Photojournalist Ricardo Rangel (February 15, 1924 - June 11, 2009) used his pictures to shine a light on the cruelty and inhumanity of colonialism. In fact, many of Rangel’s photographs were banned until Mozambique’s independence in 1975.
Rangel’s famous series, Our Nightly Bread, is a photographic essay that focuses on the Rua Araújo, the red light district of Maputo, in the 1960s and early 1970s.
At the photographer’s funeral, Prime Minister Luisa Diogo praised him, noting that he had left “an indelible mark on the history of Mozambique.” His career spanned 60 years.
Sep 30, 2014 / 375 notes

In the Deepest Embrace of the Night, Ricardo Rangel, 1970, from the series Our Nightly Bread

Photojournalist Ricardo Rangel (February 15, 1924 - June 11, 2009) used his pictures to shine a light on the cruelty and inhumanity of colonialism. In fact, many of Rangel’s photographs were banned until Mozambique’s independence in 1975.

Rangel’s famous series, Our Nightly Bread, is a photographic essay that focuses on the Rua Araújo, the red light district of Maputo, in the 1960s and early 1970s.

At the photographer’s funeral, Prime Minister Luisa Diogo praised him, noting that he had left “an indelible mark on the history of Mozambique.” His career spanned 60 years.

(via stumblequeen)


greatgrottu:

Ronnie Spector
Sep 29, 2014 / 4,119 notes

greatgrottu:

Ronnie Spector

(via stumblequeen)